Two Design discoveries.

Blue Triangle Chalk

Blue Triangle Chalk

Going on holiday to Portugal for two and half weeks was a dream. I went alone but whenever I go with family, we stay with our family friends Yvonne and Gilbert in the Algarve and their two children Remy and Gil. My mum worked with Yvonne in 1980’s London and she is ten years my mum’s junior – but they have stayed life-long friends to this day.  Yvonne moved to Portugal and married a Portuguese guy – their girl Remy is fifteen and their boy Gil is thirteen. It was near the end of my stay when I was playing snooker with Gil that I stumbled upon a piece of design that I’d never properly noticed before. I discovered blue Triangle Chalk and I was intrigued by the compact cubed shape along with its iconic black and yellow typographic packaging. I was in love and immediately took out my camera and photographed it. The photo turned out really naturally. I rubbed some of the cobalt chalk on the edge of snooker table to reveal its textured powdery residue, whilst in the background Gil’s friend Diogo is sitting on the edge of the table wearing blue floral swimming trunks which are blurred in the background. The effect is pioneering and playing true to its role, it’s ‘King of them all’. The outcome was a true appreciation to design, typography, colour and texture and discovering things by mistake. These are the best finds.

Archival labels dating back to the Grant Museum in 1828

Archival labels dating back to the Grant Museum in 1828

I was on my Time Out journey when I found AV Gallery in Marylebone. I was so excited when I stumbled across a tray full of archival ephemera in their Nature Reserves exhibition. On the lower floor of the gallery were a collection of typographic labels and tags dating back to the origins of the Grant Museum in 1828 that have since become detached from the original artefacts they once described. To see so much rarity in one place was truly sensational and satisfying. I learnt that they had been sitting in an old shoe box before they were so perfectly curated into glass covered trays. More notably, the curators at the time would have endured a challenging handwriting exam in order to become successful practitioners of important specimens. Now, the labels and rare handwritten papers are a sight of beauty, especially with the variations of discoloured sepia papers. I believe the archival information has been laid out and curated with arrangement and process in mind in order to please the viewer’s eye. I’ve become a bit fascinated with archival information and origin. I was really happy to discover this amount of ephemera in one place – it sort of made me melt.

Varied typographic handwriting and sepia tones

Varied typographic handwriting and sepia tones

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