Woolf Gallery – Summer Exhibition 2013

3D neon rubber ducks artwork

3D neon rubber ducks artwork

I made an unexpected visit to Woolff gallery as I was on my way to Warren Street and Eastcastle Street and was really inspired by their collection of 3D artworks. The exhibition notably comprised pop artworks and a common trend of art using found objects and reusable materials. For example, the use of iconic neon coloured rubber ducks, modern-day LP vinyl records cut into typographic font, bicycle reflectors and postal stamps – these were just some of the eclectic mix of materials creatively used. I was the only customer which really gave me time to absorb the works within the gallery space.

This Is Pop by Kieth Haynes - Cut Vinyl

This Is Pop by Kieth Haynes – Cut Vinyl

This Is Pop

This Is Pop

One artwork I really related to was the ‘Singing Ribbons’ piece by Matthew Maxwell which is based on military medal ribbons and reminded me of my first Art Foundation Communication project based on ‘Squares’. The piece is an intriguing set of horizontal rows with vertical colourful panelled ribbons. I realised that the ribbons become music by which the artist has done by assigning a musical note to each colour, with the width of the ribbon-colour dictating the length of that note.

Singing Ribbons (Sea) by Matthew Maxwell - Argumented reality synthenised project

Singing Ribbons (Sea) by Matthew Maxwell – Argumented reality synthenised project

‘Squares’ brief: Communication Project from Foundation – Tartan squares to define a person’s identity.

'Squares' brief - Communication Project on Foundation. People's identities communicated through an individual Tartan

‘Squares’ brief – Communication Project on Foundation. People’s identities communicated through an individual Tartan

'Squares' brief - Communication Project on Foundation. Each coloured panel is defined by a classification defined by a colour.  On a scale of 1-6, one being a person's favourite subject, six the least favourite. The width of each panel determines favouritism in centimetres.

‘Squares’ brief – Communication Project on Foundation. Each coloured panel is defined by a classification which is defined by a colour. On a scale of 1-6, one being a person’s favourite subject, six the least favourite. The width of each panel determines favouritism in centimetres. 1 Beliefs – orange, 2 Leisure – green, 3 Generation – red, 4 Music – blue, 5 Culture – yellow, 6 Fashion – pink

The ribbons are baked on to perspex panels – the newest pieces represent the five arms of military life, including Air, Land, Sea, Shore and Peace. The concept behind the work is that it generates new sound forms by combining traditional disciplines and cutting edge communication technologies with the addition of Apple or Android App stores.

Some of the other innovative artworks included mixed media, print and graphics. I was fascinated by the pieces by Susila Bailey-Bond who combines graphic prints with plastic tubes to isolate an image mounted beneath them, so that viewer can only see the image from certain angles.

Whaam! by Susila Bailey-Bond - Mixed media

Whaam! by Susila Bailey-Bond – Mixed media

Plastic tubes creating a kaleidoscope effect with the image beneath.

Plastic tubes creating a kaleidoscope effect with the image beneath.

Another piece that caught my eye was a huge circular spiral artwork of the all types of postal stamps, the Queen being the prominent visual concept. Could this relate to royal empowerment and the hierarchy in place today? This could be suggested by the shear amount of rows which makes a huge impact. I really liked the graphical appearance of it as it seems to communicate British culture.

Royal Circles by Joanne Tinker - Mixed media

Royal Circles by Joanne Tinker – Mixed media

Royal Circles

Royal Circles

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